• Thrush Kicks-off 2019 Spray Season with Record First Quarter

    Thrush Kicks-off 2019 Spray Season with Record First Quarter

    • April 2, 2019

    Thrush Aircraft just wrapped-up a record first quarter for the company, completing aircraft for delivery to eight countries on four continents – with additional orders continuing to look strong as Q2 gets underway.

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  • Simplex Earns DGAC Validation for New R66 Spray System

    Simplex Earns DGAC Validation for New R66 Spray System

    • March 29, 2019

    Simplex® Aerospace announced today it has been granted DGAC certification (IA-578/2019) from Mexico for their latest agricultural spray system for the Robinson R66 helicopter. The validation makes the Simplex® system the only certified R66 spray system in Mexico. The Simplex® Aerospace Model 266, is a next-generation spray system integrating several of Simplex® Aerospace’s newly developed

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Current Print Edition

From the Publisher

  • Pet Peeves0

    There are two pet peeves that I have harbored for a long time, and wanted to comment upon. In full disclosure, these peeves do not relate to ag-aviation, at least not directly. But, they do reflect upon the greenwashing of Americans and to a great degree the rest of the world; plastic vs paper drinking

  • Our busy seasons0

    Our busy seasons If you have not noticed by now, then you must have not “flipped” through the pages of this month’s edition of AgAir Update! Believe me when I say, “We didn’t plan it this way.” There is an overwhelming number of Canadian-related articles in this February edition. However, it could have not worked

  • Sliders — a revolution?0

    After more than forty years in the ag-aviation business, it never ceases to amaze me when a new idea becomes a reality. Of the many words that can describe ag-aviation, ingenuity would be one of those words. This month’s cover story, Sliders, is a perfect example. Just when you think that everything imaginable has been

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Hands On Flying

  • That Little Voice0

    We were flying a field that I’d never flown before. It was a good deal with a three-mile run and a low wire to hop on the north edge of the second section. There were some big, tall wires on the west edge, but they were pretty much out of the way.  Upon arriving at

  • Fertilizer challenges0

    It’s usually the thing we lead off with when the season starts; truckloads of fertilizer rolling into the airport and being staged at various remote air strips across the country.  The thing I like about dry work is it cycles quick. You’re flying a little higher, so the wires and trees are a little easier

  • Smooth Turns0

    We spend a lot of time talking about turns. Fast turns, slow turns, wide, narrow, low and high. We discuss in depth what a safe turn is and scold anyone who mentions the term “hammerhead”.  As ag pilots, we spend an awful lot of time with one wing up and the other down. Mastering good,

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In My Opinion

  • Prop Arcs and Complacency0

    Many, many years ago when I was flying old Grumman S-2E Trackers off the USS Randolph then the USS Yorktown, there was a general policy that no one ever walked through the arc a propeller would make, even, of course, while the engine is not running (duh!).   In 1970, I was in the US

  • The most insidious danger0

    It was around 12:30 PM, September 13, 1971 (not a Friday), when I rolled my Pawnee up in a ball and spent the next four months in the burn unit at Fort Sam Houston Army Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. I had been a Navy carrier pilot, and was trying to build sufficient time to

  • A Few Incidental Comments0

    It has been suggested to me by another ag pilot friend that I write about some of the safety-related items that we teach.  A lot of this will be “old hat” to many of you or maybe more like “preaching to the choir.” I have been asked on several occasions, “How fast are you going

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